Doostane Farsi Zabane Man, which translates from Persian (Farsi) to "My Persian-Speaking Friends," aims to increase friendship and cultural understanding between Iranians and Americans through a pen pal program between young citizens of Iran and the United States.

 

Mosque and School of Karim Ishan, Kelaleh, Golestan, Iran

Elementary school textbook in Iran: before and after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

Elementary school textbook in Iran: before and after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

(Source: facebook.com)

School-text images from before and after the Islamic revolution in Iran. (reprinted from source: Staging a Revolution - Chelkowski & Dabashi)

School-text images from before and after the Islamic revolution in Iran. (reprinted from source: Staging a Revolution - Chelkowski & Dabashi)

Students of a Religious School in Iran Playing Volleyball

Students of a Religious School in Iran Playing Volleyball

An itinerants’ classroom in a tent in Kerman Province.

A quarter of century ago, Iran’s itinerants - or nomadic people -  made up a quarter of the population and, for the most part, governed  the regions where they lived. Today, they form just one million of  Iran’s 75,000,000 population, scattered across the country in over 100  sub-tribes.
Even though the itinerants typically move from one location to  another, many have settled in one place either because they were forced  to by the government or because modernity has finally caught up with  them.
Many migrate to the big cities in search of work. The trend is  growing all the time and it’s possible that within the next few decades  there will be little left of these nomadic people.
The economy of Iran’s itinerants is based on livestock breeding, but  they are mainly known for producing beautiful handicrafts. Although the  signs of their traditional lifestyle are fading, traces of old popular  customs can still be found.

An itinerants’ classroom in a tent in Kerman Province.

A quarter of century ago, Iran’s itinerants - or nomadic people - made up a quarter of the population and, for the most part, governed the regions where they lived. Today, they form just one million of Iran’s 75,000,000 population, scattered across the country in over 100 sub-tribes.

Even though the itinerants typically move from one location to another, many have settled in one place either because they were forced to by the government or because modernity has finally caught up with them.

Many migrate to the big cities in search of work. The trend is growing all the time and it’s possible that within the next few decades there will be little left of these nomadic people.

The economy of Iran’s itinerants is based on livestock breeding, but they are mainly known for producing beautiful handicrafts. Although the signs of their traditional lifestyle are fading, traces of old popular customs can still be found.

Okay, so these girls are from Afghanistan, but it was too cute not to post.

Okay, so these girls are from Afghanistan, but it was too cute not to post.